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Optimal Medication Therapy in Indigenous Populations and specifically in Māori.

Year:
2019
Duration:
48 months
Approved budget:
$285,292.00
Researchers:
Ms Leanne Te Karu
Health issue:
Cardiovascular/cerebrovascular
Proposal type:
Clinical Research Training Fellowship
Lay summary
Throughout the world indigenous health outcomes are poorer than for non-indigenous people with increased rates of mortality, morbidity and disability. In Aotearoa, New Zealand there is a large body of evidence describing Māori as having the poorest health outcomes and shortest life expectancy compared to other ethnicities. Medicines can decrease morbidity and mortality by both preventing and treating illness. All medicines however can cause effects not being sought. The goal therefore is to ensure ‘optimal use’ whereby decreased morbidity/mortality from illness is achieved and drug related morbidity/mortality is mitigated, under an umbrella of person owned care. The overarching aim of this research is to better understand the barriers and enablers of medicine use in Indigenous populations and specifically for Māori in New Zealand.