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Do concomitant medicines impede safe and effective lung cancer treatment in NZ?

Year:
2019
Duration:
36 months
Approved budget:
$1,194,776.30
Researchers:
Professor Mark McKeage
Health issue:
Cancer (oncology)
Proposal type:
Project
Lay summary
Lung cancer is the biggest cancer killer in NZ. Recently, new, personalised, lung cancer treatments were introduced in NZ that have begun to reduce cancer deaths. However, these new treatments can interact badly with some other medicines that patients need to take. This can lead to patients having serious side effects or cause the new treatments not to work so well in controlling the progression of lung cancer. In this research, we want to find out which other medicines these new lung cancer treatments are used with by NZ patients. Then we will study whether the concomitant use of new lung cancer treatments with other medicines affects the safety of any of these medicines or how well the new treatments work against lung cancer. This project will improve the lives of lung cancer patients, reduce harm from treatment, and provide early-career scientists and clinicians with research experience.