Clinical Research Training Fellowship

Dr Anthony Lin
The University of Auckland
The rectosigmoid brake and its utility as a neuromodulation target
$250,000
36 months

Lay summary

Colon motility disorders and faecal incontinence are common and has a significant financial burden and impact on the quality of life. However we have limited knowledge of human colon motor patterns. Recent use of high-resolution manometry has shown that the most dominant motor pattern is a repetitive retrograde propagating activities in the distal colon. This motor pattern is believed to serve a crucial role in the development of colon motility disorders. It may also serve as a therapeutic target in limiting rectal filling, hence the term "rectosigmoid brake." This project seeks to achieve fundamental progress in the understanding of this motor pattern, through defining its origins and motor characteristics. We also seek functional evidence of its significance. The therapeutic impact using sacral neuromodulation will also be investigated. The result will impact on the understanding of pathophysiology and the management of colonic motility disorders and faecal incontinence.

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